Ukraine & NPT Regime: Publications

The Death of Arms Control; Consequences on Ukraine

By Polina Sinovets

This February we witnessed the true deterioration of arms control. The United States declared its withdrawal from the INF Treaty (Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty) due to Russia’s alleged systematic violations of it. Moscow has denied any violations while casting Washington as the one reputed to breach international treaties.

During the USSR, Ukraine possessed missile capabilities and later became a member of the INF Treaty that limited those capabilities. One outcome of the current situation is that pressures on Ukraine from both Russia and the West (NATO) will assuredly increase.

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Nuclear History Development in Ukraine/UkrSSR in 1930s

By Iryna Maksymenko

Ukraine has participated in the nuclear physics research since the beginning of physics development. However all achievements of scientists made in Ukrainian institutions were marked as general Soviet ones. The study of the Nuclear History of Ukraine report from the origins is aimed to evaluate the real role of the scientists who worked at the territory of Ukraine/Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, their contribution to the Soviet atomic project. Based on the facts and data represented in documents, old and newly published papers and books the author reached the following conclusions.

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Women and weapons: Redressing the gender gap. A Ukrainian response

By Polina Sinovets

In nuclear war, women would suffer at least as much as men. But women tend to be underrepresented in fields - such as high-level politics, diplomacy, military affairs, and science and technology - that bear on nuclear policy. Authors from four countries - Salma Malik of Pakistan (2014), Polina Sinovets of Ukraine, Reshmi Kazi of India (2014), and Jenny Nielsen of Denmark (2014) - discuss how women might gain greater influence on nuclear weapons policy and how their empowerment might affect disarmament and nonproliferation efforts.

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Denuclearization Again? Lessons from Ukraine’s Decision to Disarm

By Polina Sinovets and Mariana Budjeryn

On Dec. 25, 1991, Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev announced his resignation and handed off his nuclear strike authorization unit, the so-called Cheget briefcase, to Russian President Boris Yeltsin. With this final act, the Soviet Union was no more. What remained, however, was Soviet Union’s gargantuan nuclear arsenal and the military-industrial complex that produced it. The problem was that now it was situated not in one, but in four sovereign states: Belarus, Kazakhstan, Russia, and Ukraine. This unprecedented development spurred fears that the biggest wave of nuclear proliferation in history was in the offing, fears that fortunately failed to materialize.

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Interpreting the Bomb: Ownership and Deterrence in Ukraine’s Nuclear Discourse

By Polina Sinovets and Mariana Budjeryn

Nuclear deterrence thinking has become so entrenched in US academic and policy circles that it only seems natural that other states regard nuclear weapons in the same terms. Yet is it necessarily so? In this article, we examine the case of Ukraine to understand how its leaders interpreted the value of the nuclear weapons deployed on Ukrainian territory in 1990–1994.

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Ban the bomb by… banning the bomb? A Ukrainian response

By Polina Sinovets

When the UN First Committee voted in October to initiate conferences at which a treaty banning nuclear weapons would be negotiated, a country such as Ukraine might have been expected to vote in favor. At the end of the Cold War, after all, Ukraine had inherited the world’s third-largest arsenal of nuclear weapons from the Soviet Union – but Kiev gave them up. Ukraine also joined the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) as a nonnuclear weapon state, and it remains a treaty member in good standing. Moreover, Ukraine is threatened to its east by one of the world’s two largest nuclear powers – and does not benefit from the nuclear deterrence capacity of the other. So Ukraine voted in favor of banning the Bomb – right?

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Round-table transcript "Ukrainian crisis - is there any influence over the NPT regime?"

Polina Sinovets

Let me start our roundtable which is dedicated to the implications and influence of the Ukrainian crisis on NPT regime. I am very glad to see you all here. I think the Ukrainian crisis plays great role in the transformation of the system of the international relations after the Cold War. I think that is one of the signs that the system is in crisis. We are here to discuss it. I think this is a great and valuable opportunity for us to hear opinions from brilliant scientists from the different countries. It’s really great we are all here and we can exchange our opinions.

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