Nate Jones

Nate Jones

- 2017 Ukraine Nuclear History Research Fellow

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CAREER

March - May 2017 - 2017 Ukraine Nuclear History Research Fellow, OdCNP, Odessa, Ukraine

2009-Present - National Security Archive, Director of the Freedom of Information Act Project, Washington DC

EDUCATION AND WORK EXPERIENCE

March - June 2017 – Nuclear History Research Fellow at the Odessa Center for Nonproliferation, Ukraine

2014 - Present – Member of the Federal FOIA Advisory Committee, working with goverment and non-government representatives to improve FOIA

2013 - Present – Board member for the American Society of Access Professionals, the professional association of government FOI officers

2015 – Nuclear Boot Camp immersion course presented by University of Roma Tre and the Nuclear Proliferation International History Project

2012 – Researcher at the Freedom of Information Foundation (Svoboda Info), Saint Petersburg, Russia

2007 - 2009 – The George Washington University, Washington, DC. Master of Arts. History with a concentration on the Cold War and Russian language

2008 - 2009 – Researcher at the Cold War International History Project, Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars

February – May 2015 – work on a contract at the Ukrainian embassy to Latvia as secretary assistant, Riga, Latvia

February – May 2015– semester-long students exchange programme in European studies with University of Latvia, Riga, Latvia

01.09.2014 – 21.11.2014 - Intern at the Delegation of the EU in Ukraine, Press and Information section., Kiev, Ukraine

2007 – Moscow State University. Intermediate Level Russian Language Certificate

2001-2005 – Lewis and Clark College, Portland, Oregon. Bachelor of Arts. Cold War History and Russian Language

BOOK

Able Archer 83: The Secret History of the NATO Exercise that Almost Triggered Nuclear War a narrative and collection of declassified documents examining the intersection of Cold War animosity, nuclear miscalculation, and government secrecy

ARTICLES AND PRESENTATIONS

  • “The Able Archer 83 Sourcebook,” ongoing compilation and analysis of more than 1,000 pages of declassified documents on the 1983 War Scare at the National Security Archive;
  • Able Archer 83 presented at the US National Archives, January 2017;
  • “How Classified Presidential Library Records are Released to the Public,” The Federalist, Newsletter of the Society for History in the Federal Government, January 2017;
  • “’There’s Classified and Then There’s Classified:’ Tangible Steps to Fix the Classification and Declassification System,” for the Public Interest Declassification Board, December 2016;
  • Guest on International Spy Museum’s SpyCast podcast, November 2016;
  • “Able Archer 83: The Secret History,” for the Woodrow Wilson Center, October 2016;
  • “The Football War,” for the Woodrow Wilson Center’s Sport and the Cold War Podcast;
  • “Against Transparency?” A rebuttal to Matthew Yglesias, September 2016;
  • ”The Long, Ugly Journey of a FOIA Request through the Referral Black Hole,” June 2016;
  • “The Wilson Ramos Kidnapping Declassified,” April 2016;
  • “Requester’s Voice: Nate Jones,” MuckRock, February 2016;
  • Newsweek “Special Edition: Declassified,” editor at large, January 2016;
  • Gelman Library Workshop. “Let the Sun Shine: FOIA Requests for Journalist and Researchers,” November 2015;
  • “Testimony Before the US House of Representatives Committee on Oversight and Government Reform on Ensuring Transparency through the Freedom of Information Act,” June 2015;
  • Summer Institute on Conducting Archival Research. “FOIA for Historians,” History and Public Policy Program, Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars, presenter, May 2015. “Unnecessary Freedom of Information Act Fees,” Sunshine Week Syndicated Column, March 2015 ;
  • “Most Agencies Falling Short on Mandate for Online Records,” March 2015;
  • “What We Can Learn from the Death of a Unanimously-Supported FOIA Bill, and Janus-Faced Support for Open Government,” December 2014;
  • “Operation RYaN and the Vicious Circle of Intelligence,” Cold War International History Project, November 2014;
  • “Clandestine Reading Room FOIA Workshop,” presenter, Cooper Union, November 2014;
  • “Legislation Seeks to Reform FOIA and Improve Access to Government Information,” Free Speech Radio News, October 2014;
  • Department of State FOIA Training. “Advice from Frequent FOIA Requesters,” panelist, October 2014;
  • “Black Holes in the Predecisional Universe: Agencies Gain a New Justification for Secrecy,” Perspectives on History, August 2014;
  • Einstein Forum Potsdam. “At the Brink of Nuclear War? The Forgotten Able Archer Crisis of 1983,” contributor, May 2014;
  • Summer Institute on Conducting Archival Research. “FOIA for Historians,” George Washington University, presenter, May 2014;
  • “The Menace of Overclassification,” Sunshine Week syndicated column, March 2014;
  • “Half of Federal Agencies Still Use Outdated Freedom of Information Regulations,” March 2014;
  • “Countdown to Declassification: Finding Answers to a 1983 Nuclear War Scare,” Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, November 2013;
  • “Able Archer 83 and the ‘Dangerous Red Line’ of Nuclear War,” paper presented at the Universitat Tubingen Conference on Threatened Order, Societies Under Stress – Challenges, Concepts, Ideas During the Cold War of the 1970s & 1980s, September 2013;
  • “Declassifying State Secrets,” panelist at the Society of Historians of American Foreign Relations annual meeting, June 2013;
  • Open Government Partnership in Armenia, “Access to Information Laws in Open Governments,” presenter at conference held by the Government of the Republic of Armenia, USAID, and the Freedom of Information Center of Armenia, Yerevan, June 2014;
  • “War Scare: The Real-Life War Game that Almost Led to Nuclear Armageddon,” ForeignPolicy.com, May 2013;
  • Summer Institute on Conducting Archival Research. “Using the Freedom of Information Act and Mandatory Declassification Review to Win the Release of Documents,” George Washington University, presenter, May 2013;
  • “Freedom of Information Regulations: Still Outdated, Still Undermining Openness,” National Security Archive FOIA Audit, March 2013;
  • Civil Society Report on Implementation of the First US National Action Plan, www.openthegovernment.org, March 2013;
  • “Justice Department Repeats as Rosemary Award Winner For Worst Open Government Performance in 2012,” www.nsarchive.org, March 2013;
  • Нейт Джонс: «Права журналистов и блогеров должны быть защищены законодательно» (Nate Jones, “Rights of Journalists and bloggers should be legally protected.”);
  • “No One Ensuring Agencies Comply with FOIA,” The Brechner Report, February 2013;
  • Transparency in the Obama Administration: A Fourth Year Assessment, “Regs and Dregs,” presenter, American University, January 2013;
  • ‘”Dynamite’ Pentagon Interview Behind ‘Zero Dark Thirty,’” ForeignPolicy.com, January 2013;
  • “The Zero Dark Thirty File: Lifting the Government’s Shroud Over the Mission that Killed Osama bin Laden,” National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book, January 2013;
  • “The True Spy Story behind Argo,” ForeignPolicy.com, October 2012;
  • “The National Declassification Center: Will it Meet Our Expectations?” presenter, American Association of Law Librarians, July 2012;
  • “Learn the Secrets of the Freedom of Information Act,” presenter, National Press Club, June 2012;
  • Summer Institute on Conducting Archival Research. “FOIA for Historians,” George Washington University, presenter, May 2012;
  • “The Zelikow Memo: Internal Critique of Bush Torture Memos Declassified,” National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book, April 2012;
  • Transparency in the Obama Administration: A Third Year Assessment. “The Open Government Status Report,” presenter, American University, January 2012;
  • “Classification Reform Key to Obama’s FOIA Vision,” The Brechner Report, August 2011;
  • “Eight Federal Agencies Have FOIA Requests a Decade Old,” National Security Archive FOIA Audit, July 2011;
  • Summer Institute on Conducting Archival Research. “Constructing Effective FOIA Requests,” George Washington University, presenter, June 2011;
  • “The Osama bin Laden File,” National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book, May 2011;
  • A World of (wiki)Leaks. “Freedom of Information and the National Security Apparatus,” panelist, April 2011;
  • “Glass Half Full: Agencies Lag in Fulfilling President’s Openness pledge,” The National Security Archive FOIA Audit, March 2011;
  • Federal Computer Week’s Solutions Seminar: Leveraging Technology to Fulfill FOIA, presenter, August 2010;
  • “Agencies Slow to Implement Obama’s FOIA Policy,” The Brechner Report, August 2010;
  • “Sunshine and Shadows: The Clear Obama Message for Freedom of Information Meets Mixed Results,” The National Security Archive FOIA Audit, March 2010;
  • “The Missiles of November: Able Archer 83 and Reagan’s Turn from Confrontation to Rapprochement,” for the Center of the Study of the Presidency, April 2009;
  • “’One Misstep Could Trigger a Great War:’ Operation RYaN, Able Archer 83, and the 1983 War Scare,” Master’s Thesis for The George Washington University, May 2009;
  • “Antebellum Washington,” for the Washington DC Historical Society Curriculum Project, May 2009;
  • “The Study and Implementation of Benzedrine by the United States Army Air Forces in World War II,” presented for the George Washington University Military History Group, December 2008;
  • “Operation RYaN, Able Archer 83, and Miscalculation: The War Scare of 1983,” presented at the 2008 University of California Santa Barbara International Graduate Conference on the Cold War, April 2008;
  • “The Missiles of November: Able Archer 83,” The Meridian Journal of International and Cross-Cultural Perspectives, April 2005;
  • The Old Tiger and The Aged Mother Who Nurtured Noble Sons. Calvin and Julia Brown Mateer: Letters from China. The Presbyterian Missionary Archive, Philadelphia (2005). A 30-page annotated collection of letters from missionaries in China, 1864 to 1900, April 2005.